When to Get Married as a Christian

A Christian couple getting married in a church
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Marriage may not be rocket science, but it surely isn’t something easy either. Many people believe they’re ready to make a life-long commitment and walk down the aisle only to terminate the marriage just a few years later. Currently, in America, about 50% of marriages end in divorce. Another fascinating study area is the divorce rate among couples who didn’t date for long before marrying. A long courtship before marriage has been associated with improved marital satisfaction and a decreased incidence of divorce.

One of the greatest gifts from God is marriage, and it is one that we must be prepared to accept. It’s like receiving a gift from your parents like a car, but you’re not old enough to drive. Imagine having no driver’s license and cruising down the highway. That’s a surefire recipe for disaster. It’s the same way with marriages. When the Lord grants us a gift in the form of a spouse, we must be prepared to receive it. Here are a few things that you need to consider before answering the question of when to get married Christian.

Have A Healthy Relationship With the Lord

A person’s heart should be given to God before offering it to another person. He has complete power over everything and will guide your destiny, even in romance, if the person allows that. A person’s commitment to put the Lord first prevents them from turning a spouse, the marriage, or the process of being married into a trifle.

A spouse is a gift, but they are by no means a God and shouldn’t be kept before God and His worship. Find love and happiness in God, and He will fulfill all of your desires (Psalms 37:4). A person’s readiness for marriage is determined by their willingness to cultivate a bond with the Lord and surrender to His will, decision, and timing.

Know Yourself

The Lord educates us regarding ourselves after we build a connection with Him. We in our inmost essence were created in the womb, stitched by His hands according to Psalms 139:13–14. Since we are formed most wonderfully, we praise His magnificent work.

Before getting married, a person should learn everything about themselves, including their temperament, peculiarities, biggest peeves, hobbies, abilities, and talents. A person’s ability to make decisions about their spouse they will spend the remainder of their lives with improves as they better understand themselves.

Make Peace With Childhood Issues

The heart is tricky and gets afflicted, making it difficult to understand (Jeremiah 29:17). We are often unaware of the heart’s contents until we are confronted with a difficult situation. What’s inside of us oozes out and contaminates everyone and everything in our way.

This could take the form of a heated debate or a financial disaster. Situations like these trigger our unhealed scars and prompt us to react in harmful ways. A person who is ready for marriage has spent time exploring their past trauma to take part in a marital life complete rather than broken.

Sharing the Same Views As Your Partner

This could include political convictions, spiritual issues, familial beliefs, and other things. If one spouse values knowledge and hard work while the other doesn’t, this may end in tensions and possibly divorce if only one spouse has financial responsibility.

As an example, it would be ill-advised to marry if one individual is a Protestant and the other one is Catholic.

Maybe one person was brought up to believe that women should only stay home and care for the children, while their wife was brought up around working women. These views and values are opposed to one another, resulting in insurmountable marital conflicts. It’s okay to have individual values, but they should align with major decisions.

Common Purpose

Several married couples become estranged since they pursue their individual mission or calling rather than a shared one. Lord has called every one of us to our own vocation, but an added call is given to married couples.

Both people in the relationship, as an example, believe that the Lord wants them to be in a mission field or city to perform their ministry services. Or both the people think they have been called on to become pastors, make disciples, or provide a welcoming environment for outsiders. These are only a few instances, but a strong bond is formed when people work together towards the same goal.

Respect Each Other

Do they treat you with respect when they speak to you? Does your companion uplift you or break you down with their remarks? Even if people can change, we don’t marry them based on what they can become but rather on their current qualities. Their respect for the Lord, if they have any, is reflected in the way people converse and treat their significant other.

An aggressive companion will most likely be violent in marriage. All sins, including short temper and anger tendencies, are forgiven but getting into a marriage with someone who has no regard to focus and mend these habits is not only stupid but also highly dangerous.

Emotionally Strong

Emotions can be difficult to understand. They’re a huge part of any person but depending on them can be difficult at times. An emotionally strong person can process their pain and articulate and responsibly convey their sentiments. This is critical to establishing solid communication in a relationship. If a person doesn’t prioritize this in their life, these unresolved emotions will eventually manifest in their actions. Don’t be worried about anything, but in each situation, you should submit your requests to the Lord through prayer and supplication (Philippians 7–8).

Our Final Thoughts

Even though when to get married Christian is a daunting question to ask, marriage can become a wonderful experience with the right partner. With the help of the Lord and his peaceful ways, you’ll be able to make the right decision while keeping your faith as the top priority.